Sudbury Lincoln CRANE http://cranehelp.org All the youth and family support services in the Sudbury and Lincoln communities in to one collaborative structure Tue, 19 Dec 2017 19:22:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter December 19 http://cranehelp.org/2017/12/19/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-december-19/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/12/19/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-december-19/#respond Tue, 19 Dec 2017 19:22:01 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=25503 Life for children and teenagers can seem much more carefree than the life of an adult. However, many children and young adults can feel sources of stress including school work and their social life. These stressors can feel overwhelming, especially to a child who doesn't understand how to manage or cope with stress.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter
December 19

FEATURED TOPIC: MANAGING STRESS

Life for children and teenagers can seem much more carefree than the life of an adult. However, many children and young adults can feel sources of stress including school work and their social life. These stressors can feel overwhelming, especially to a child who doesn’t understand how to manage or cope with stress.

According to the 2016 MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey, the percentage of Sudbury middle school students who reported feeling that life was very stressful in the past 30 days has increased over the last two surveys, from 12-13 percent in 2006 to 16 percent in 2016. Stress related to school issues was most common, reported by 44 percent of youth, followed by stress related to social issues at 19 percent, and stress related to appearance issues at 18 percent.

Additionally, survey results revealed that the number of students at Lincoln Sudbury High School who reported feeling that life is very stressful in the past 30 days has increased from 38 percent in 2014 to 41 percent in 2016. Of those students, 75 percent reported school issues as being a source of stress, followed by 36 reporting social issues, and 31 percent appearance issues as causes of stress.

Among school issues, 76 percent of high school students reported that getting good grades was a source of school-related stress, 69 percent reported that the ability to finish school work and study enough and 38 percent said pressure from parents/guardians to do well in school.

To help your child develop healthy ways to deal with stress, Sudbury Lincoln CRANE would like to pass along some tips from KidsHealth.org:

  • Notice out loud. Tell your child when you notice that something’s bothering him or her. If you can, name the feeling you think your child is experiencing. This shouldn’t sound like an accusation or put a child on the spot. It’s just a casual observation that you’re interested in hearing more about your child’s concern. Be sympathetic and show you care and want to understand.
  • Listen to your child. Ask your child to tell you what’s wrong. Listen attentively and calmly — with interest, patience, openness, and caring. Avoid any urge to judge, blame, lecture, or say what you think your child should have done instead. The idea is to let your child’s concerns (and feelings) be heard. Try to get the whole story by asking questions like “And then what happened?” Take your time. And let your child take his or her time, too.
  • Comment briefly on the feelings you think your child was experiencing. For example, you might say “That must have been upsetting,” “No wonder you felt mad when they wouldn’t let you in the game,” or “That must have seemed unfair to you.” Doing this shows that you understand what your child felt, why, and that you care. Feeling understood and listened to helps your child feel supported by you, and that is especially important in times of stress.
  • Put a label on it. Many younger kids do not yet have words for their feelings. If your child seems angry or frustrated, use those words to help him or her learn to identify the emotions by name. Putting feelings into words helps kids communicate and develop emotional awareness — the ability to recognize their own emotional states. Kids who can do so are less likely to reach the behavioral boiling point where strong emotions come out through behaviors rather than communicated with words.
  • Help your child think of things to do. If there’s a specific problem that’s causing stress, talk together about what to do. Encourage your child to think of a couple of ideas. You can start the brainstorming if necessary, but don’t do all the work. Your child’s active participation will build confidence. Support the good ideas and add to them as needed. Ask, “How do you think this will work?”
  • Listen and move on. Sometimes talking and listening and feeling understood is all that’s needed to help a child’s frustrations begin to melt away. Afterward, try changing the subject and moving on to something more positive and relaxing. Help your child think of something to do to feel better. Don’t give the problem more attention than it deserves.
  • Limit stress where possible. If certain situations are causing stress, see if there are ways to change things. For instance, if too many after-school activities consistently cause homework stress, it might be necessary to limit activities to leave time and energy for homework.
  • Just be there. Kids don’t always feel like talking about what’s bothering them. Sometimes that’s OK. Let your kids know you’ll be there when they do feel like talking. Even when kids don’t want to talk, they usually don’t want parents to leave them alone. You can help your child feel better just by being there — keeping him or her company, spending time together. So if you notice that your child seems to be down in the dumps, stressed, or having a bad day — but doesn’t feel like talking — initiate something you can do together. Take a walk, watch a movie, shoot some hoops, or bake some cookies. Isn’t it nice to know that your presence really counts?
  • Be patient. As a parent, it hurts to see your child unhappy or stressed. But try to resist the urge to fix every problem. Instead, focus on helping your child, slowly but surely, grow into a good problem-solver — a kid who knows how to roll with life’s ups and downs, put feelings into words, calm down when needed, and bounce back to try again.

While be able to help your child deal with stress is important, it is also important for parents and guardians to watch out for signs that their children are too busy. Over-scheduled kids may:

  • feel tired, anxious, or depressed
  • complain of headaches and stomachaches, which may be due to stress, missed meals, or lack of sleep
  • fall behind on their schoolwork, causing their grades to drop

For more information about stress management, visit KidsHealth.org or the CRANE website.

UPCOMING EVENTS

NAMI Basics

NAMI Basics is a 6 week education program for parents and caregivers of children and adolescents living with emotional and behavioral issues. NAMI Basics is taught by understanding teachers who are parents or caregivers of children with similar issues. Taking NAMI Basics will give you the tools you will need to help you make the best decisions possible for the care of your child. You will learn communication tips, how to problem-solve and the skills to help you cope with the emotional impact of caring for your challenging child. You will find out about the IEP process, insurance, benefits, diagnoses and treatment.

The course consists of six classes, each lasting for 2 ½ hours. Classes may be offered weekly for six consecutive weeks, or may be offered twice per week for three weeks to accommodate hectic schedules. All instruction materials are FREE to participants.

Please contact the teacher listed to get details. Preregistration is required since space is limited. If you’re interested in taking a class, and none are available in your area, please contact Director of Family Programs, Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Interested in becoming a NAMI Basics teacher? Please contact Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Schedule of Classes:

 

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter December 5 http://cranehelp.org/2017/12/05/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-december-5/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/12/05/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-december-5/#respond Tue, 05 Dec 2017 18:07:19 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=24354 As the weather continues to get colder and families are spending more time indoors, it is important for parents and guardians to keep their children active and practice healthy habits.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter
December 5

FEATURED TOPIC: HEALTHY HABITS

As the weather continues to get colder and families are spending more time indoors, it is important for parents and guardians to keep their children active and practice healthy habits.

To help your child begin practicing healthy habits at a young age, be a role model and make healthy choices of your own. The American Heart Association recommends the following tips to get started:

  • Be a good role model – You don’t have to be perfect all the time, but if kids see you trying to eat right and getting physically active, they’ll take notice of your efforts. You’ll send a message that good health is important to your family.
  • Keep things positive – Kid’s don’t like to hear what they can’t do, tell them what they can do instead. Keep it fun and positive. Everyone likes to be praised for a job well done. Celebrate successes and help children and teens develop a good self-image.
  • Get the whole family moving – Plan times for everyone to get moving together. Take walks, ride bikes, go swimming, garden or just play hide-and-seek outside. Everyone will benefit from the exercise and the time together.
  •  Be realistic – Setting realistic goals and limits are key to adopting any new behavior. Small steps and gradual changes can make a big difference in your health over time, so start small and build up.
  •  Limit TV, video game and computer time – These habits lead to a sedentary lifestyle and excessive snacking, which increase risks for obesity and cardiovascular disease.
  •  Encourage physical activities that they’ll really enjoy – Every child is unique. Let your child experiment with different activities until they find something that they really love doing. They’ll stick with it longer if they love it.
  •  Pick truly rewarding rewards – Don’t reward children with TV, video games, candy or snacks for a job well done. Find other ways to celebrate good behavior.
  •  Make dinnertime a family time – When everyone sits down together to eat, there’s less chance of children eating the wrong foods or snacking too much. Get your kids involved in cooking and planning meals. Everyone develops good eating habits together and the quality time with the family will be an added bonus.
  •  Make a game of reading food labels – The whole family will learn what’s good for their health and be more conscious of what they eat. It’s a habit that helps change behavior for a lifetime. Learn more about reading nutrition labels.
  • Stay involved – Be an advocate for healthier children. Insist on good food choices at school. Make sure your children’s healthcare providers are monitoring cardiovascular indicators like BMI, blood pressure and cholesterol.

For more information and resources, visit the AHA website or the Alliance for a Healthier Generation website.

To help keep your children active and encourage healthy habits, there are several local recreational resources for parents and guardians to consider, including the Sudbury Family NetworkThrive Support & Advocacy, the Sudbury Park and Recreation Department,  and the Lincoln Parks and Recreation Department, which offer programs year-round.

To learn more about Sudbury Public Schools Wellness programs, individuals can visit the District website to view the School Wellness Policy. Additionally, community members are encouraged to contact the District Wellness Coordinator to learn about the School Wellness Advisory Committee activities and other ways you can be involved in supporting healthy habits within the Sudbury learning community.

Next Newsletter Topic: Managing Stress

UPCOMING EVENTS

Open Invitation: Regulating Our Brains and Bodies for Learning
Wednesday, Dec. 6 at 12:30 p.m. @ Milestones

“My Hero Brother” Movie Screening
Sunday, Dec. 10 at 6 p.m. @ West Newton Cinema

Parent/Professional Advocacy League Statewide
Tuesday, Dec. 12 at 10 a.m. @ Plymouth Church in Framingham

NAMI Basics

NAMI Basics is a 6 week education program for parents and caregivers of children and adolescents living with emotional and behavioral issues. NAMI Basics is taught by understanding teachers who are parents or caregivers of children with similar issues. Taking NAMI Basics will give you the tools you will need to help you make the best decisions possible for the care of your child. You will learn communication tips, how to problem-solve and the skills to help you cope with the emotional impact of caring for your challenging child. You will find out about the IEP process, insurance, benefits, diagnoses and treatment.

The course consists of six classes, each lasting for 2 ½ hours. Classes may be offered weekly for six consecutive weeks, or may be offered twice per week for three weeks to accommodate hectic schedules. All instruction materials are FREE to participants.

Please contact the teacher listed to get details. Preregistration is required since space is limited. If you’re interested in taking a class, and none are available in your area, please contact Director of Family Programs, Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Interested in becoming a NAMI Basics teacher? Please contact Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Schedule of Classes:

 

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter November 21 http://cranehelp.org/2017/11/21/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-november-21/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/11/21/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-november-21/#respond Tue, 21 Nov 2017 19:57:23 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=23013 Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc. 390 Lincoln Road Sudbury, MA 01776 Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017 Contact: John Guilfoil Phone: 617-993-0003 Email: john@jgpr.net Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter November 21 FEATURED TOPIC: SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING The concept of social and emotional learning (SEL) has been around for quite some time, but many people don’t fully understand its… Read More»

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter
November 21

FEATURED TOPIC: SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING

The concept of social and emotional learning (SEL) has been around for quite some time, but many people don’t fully understand its meaning or the impact these key competencies can have on a person’s life trajectory. Social and emotional learning enhances individuals’ capacity to integrate skills, attitudes, and behaviors to deal effectively and ethically with daily tasks and challenges.

According to the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL), social and emotional learning is the process through which children and adults acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions.

Examples of SEL include teaching young children to recognize how they feel or how someone else might be feeling through modeling and coaching, practicing group decision-making and setting classroom rules through class meetings. Children can also develop important social-emotional competencies like cooperation and teamwork through participation in team sports and daily group efforts, such as completing household chores.

Learning is a naturally social process. Emotions and relationships with the people we interact with can affect how we learn and use that information in various social contexts. CASEL states, “On the one hand, emotions can enable us to generate an active interest in learning and sustain our engagement in it. On the other hand, unmanaged stress and poor regulation of impulses interfere with attention and memory and contribute to behaviors disruptive to learning.”

Social and emotional learning has been proven to have a positive and lasting impact on students. A 2017 meta-analysis from CASEL, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Loyola University and the University of British Colombia revealed that SEL programs, which, in the past, have shown immediate improvements in mental health, social skills, and academic achievement, will continue to benefit students for years to come. In fact, according to the study, students exposed to SEL in school continued to do better than their peers up to 18 years late in a number of areas including positive social behaviors and attitudes, skills such as empathy and teamwork, and academics. Additionally, they have fewer conduct problems, less emotional distress, and lower drug use, among many other benefits.

A 2015 national study published in the American Journal of Public Health found statistically significant associations between SEL skills in kindergarten and key outcomes for young adults years later in education and employment. A 2013 survey of 704 employers conducted by The Chronicle of Higher Education and American Public Media’s Marketplace has shown that half of those surveyed said they had trouble finding recent graduates to fill vacancies in their companies. Even though applicants had the technical prowess, they lacked the communication, adaptability, decision-making, and problem-solving skills needed to do the job.

To promote your child’s social and emotional learning, parents can:

  • Establish a positive relationship with the school. Modeling productive collaborations and behaviors will positively impact your child.
  • Adopt practices that reinforce your child’s SEL skills at home. Establishing routines, such as a set bedtime and having your child organize belongings for school the night before help build these skills.
  • Acknowledge your child’s strengths, and work with him/her to grow underdeveloped skills by providing explicit feedback and plenty of opportunities to practice these skills.

To promote healthy social-emotional growth, it is important for parents to be aware of their own social-emotional needs. For a list of parenting supports and other resources, visit the town social work website: https://sudbury.ma.us/socialworker/ and click on the Youth & Families. Also, there may be times when caregivers or children are managing complex needs that impact social-emotional functioning. For a listing of mental health resources for children and families, click on the Mental Health and Substance Abuse tab on the town social work website listed above.

Next Newsletter Topic: Healthy Habits

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Life in the Trump Era: A Look at Gender, Culture and Civic Engagement
Thursday, Nov. 30 at 12:30 p.m. @ The Cheever House

College Fair for the Challenged Learner
Wednesday, Nov. 29 at 6:30 p.m. in Braintree

NAMI Basics

NAMI Basics is a 6 week education program for parents and caregivers of children and adolescents living with emotional and behavioral issues. NAMI Basics is taught by understanding teachers who are parents or caregivers of children with similar issues. Taking NAMI Basics will give you the tools you will need to help you make the best decisions possible for the care of your child. You will learn communication tips, how to problem-solve and the skills to help you cope with the emotional impact of caring for your challenging child. You will find out about the IEP process, insurance, benefits, diagnoses and treatment.

The course consists of six classes, each lasting for 2 ½ hours. Classes may be offered weekly for six consecutive weeks, or may be offered twice per week for three weeks to accommodate hectic schedules. All instruction materials are FREE to participants.

Please contact the teacher listed to get details. Preregistration is required since space is limited. If you’re interested in taking a class, and none are available in your area, please contact Director of Family Programs, Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Interested in becoming a NAMI Basics teacher? Please contact Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Schedule of Classes:

 

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

The post Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter November 21 appeared first on Sudbury Lincoln CRANE.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter November 7 http://cranehelp.org/2017/11/07/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-november-7/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/11/07/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-november-7/#respond Tue, 07 Nov 2017 17:36:48 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=21856 Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc. 390 Lincoln Road Sudbury, MA 01776 Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 Contact: John Guilfoil Phone: 617-993-0003 Email: john@jgpr.net Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter November 7 FEATURED TOPIC: GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT While smoking has declined in the United States over the last several years, cigarettes and other tobacco product use remains relevant, which means… Read More»

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter
November 7

FEATURED TOPIC: GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT

While smoking has declined in the United States over the last several years, cigarettes and other tobacco product use remains relevant, which means it is always important for parents and guardians to talk with children early on about the dangers of smoking cigarettes and tobacco.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), tobacco use begins primarily during adolescence. More than 3,200 people under the age of 18 smoke their first cigarette every day in the United States.

Although there is still work to do to completely end tobacco use, the trends in Lincoln and Sudbury are encouraging. According to the 2016 MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey (MWAHS) results, cigarette use among Curtis Middle School students has continued to decline. In fact, cigarette smoking among middle school students has declined at every time point since the MWAHS began — current levels are at one-third of those first measured in 2006.

At the high school level, the percentage of students who have smoked in their lifetime and who currently smoke remains low. The 2016 MWAHS results showed that 15 percent of seniors, 8 percent of juniors, 6 percent of sophomores and 6 percent of freshman had reported smoking cigarettes in their lifetime. Additionally, lifetime electronic cigarette use by LS students is down by 3 percent since 2014 and current electronic cigarette use is down by 6 percent since 2014.

The MWAHS results indicated that the most common ways students are getting cigarettes is by borrowing them from someone else or giving money to someone else to buy them.

The American Lung Association recommends that parents and guardians follow these tips when talking to their children about smoking tobacco, in any form:

  • Tell your children honestly and directly that you don’t want them to smoke cigarettes. Give them clear, consistent messages about the risks of smoking.
  • Start talking to your kids about smoking when they are young, about 5 or 6 years old, and continue through their high school years. Explain the health dangers of smoking, as well as the unpleasant physical aspects such as bad breath, and discolored teeth and nails.
  • Set a good example for your kids by not smoking. Parents who smoke are more likely to have children who smoke.
  • If you’re a parent who smokes, the best thing you can do is to quit. Talk to your kids about how difficult it is to quit smoking and how much easier it would have been if you’d never started smoking in the first place. In the meantime, don’t smoke around your children and never let them have any of your cigarettes.
  • Establish a smoke-free policy in your home. Don’t allow anyone to smoke indoors.
  • Support tobacco-free schools and insist that school health programs include tobacco-use prevention education.
  • Find out if your children have any friends that smoke. Talk with your kids about ways to refuse a cigarette.
  • If you catch your teen smoking, avoid threats and ultimatums. Ask a few questions and find out why your child is smoking; he or she may want to be accepted by a peer group or want your attention. Talk about what changes can be made in your teen’s life to help him or her stop smoking.
  • As you talk to your child about their smoking, point out that he or she is probably already addicted to nicotine. The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars each year to make sure their products are as appealing and as addictive as possible. Ask your child to think about how they’ve been manipulated and used by tobacco companies. This realization makes many teen smokers angry and can help motivate them to quit.

For more information about smoking and how to talk to your kids about it, visit the American Lung Association’s website or thetruth.com.

Next Newsletter Topic: Social Emotional Learning

UPCOMING EVENTS

“If Only” Film Screening
Tuesday, Nov. 7 at 6:30 p.m. @ Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School

Dr. Karen Levine’s Presentation on Anxiety
Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. @ Curtis Middle School in the Library

Strategies for Reducing Academic Stress and Creating Successful Students
Thursday, Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. @ Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School

safeTALK
Wednesday, Nov. 15 at 2 p.m. @ Memorial Congregational Church

NAMI Basics

NAMI Basics is a 6 week education program for parents and caregivers of children and adolescents living with emotional and behavioral issues. NAMI Basics is taught by understanding teachers who are parents or caregivers of children with similar issues. Taking NAMI Basics will give you the tools you will need to help you make the best decisions possible for the care of your child. You will learn communication tips, how to problem-solve and the skills to help you cope with the emotional impact of caring for your challenging child. You will find out about the IEP process, insurance, benefits, diagnoses and treatment.

The course consists of six classes, each lasting for 2 ½ hours. Classes may be offered weekly for six consecutive weeks, or may be offered twice per week for three weeks to accommodate hectic schedules. All instruction materials are FREE to participants.

Please contact the teacher listed to get details. Preregistration is required since space is limited. If you’re interested in taking a class, and none are available in your area, please contact Director of Family Programs, Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Interested in becoming a NAMI Basics teacher? Please contact Ilya Cherkasov at 617-580-8541.

Schedule of Classes:

 

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

The post Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter November 7 appeared first on Sudbury Lincoln CRANE.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter October 24 http://cranehelp.org/2017/11/01/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-october-24/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/11/01/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-october-24/#respond Wed, 01 Nov 2017 18:57:47 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=21347 Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc. 390 Lincoln Road Sudbury, MA 01776 Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017 Contact: John Guilfoil Phone: 617-993-0003 Email: john@jgpr.net Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter October 24 FEATURED TOPIC: HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which serves as a good opportunity to talk to children about healthy dating relationships and how to recognize… Read More»

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter
October 24

FEATURED TOPIC: HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, which serves as a good opportunity to talk to children about healthy dating relationships and how to recognize potentially dangerous habits. It is also important for parents and guardians to recognize that their own relationship habits can have a strong influence on children.

Dating violence does not just affect adults — people of all ages and backgrounds have experienced dating violence. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among high school students who dated, 21 percent of females and 10 percent of males experienced physical and/or sexual dating violence. Furthermore, among adult victims of rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner, 22 percent of women and 15 percent of men first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age.

Teen dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. The abuse can happen in person or electronically and could occur between a current or former dating partner.

Dating violence can have serious short-term and long-term effects — many teens who have experienced dating violence do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. This makes it extremely important for parents and guardians to discuss what it means to be in a healthy relationship and when they should talk to an adult.

In a healthy relationship:

• Your partner respects you and your individuality.
• You both feel safe being open and honest.
• Your partner supports you and your choices, even when they disagree with you.
• Both of you have equal say and respected boundaries.
• Your partner understands that you need to study or hang out with friends or family.
• You can communicate your feelings without being afraid of negative consequences.

In an unhealthy relationship, your partner:

• Checks your cellphone or email without your permission
• Constantly puts you down
• Exhibits extreme jealousy or insecurity
• Exhibits an explosive temper
• Isolates you from family or friends
• Makes false accusations
• Exhibits mood swings
• Physically hurts you in any way
• Is possessive
• Tells you what to do

Click here for the Teen Brochure for Healthy Relationships from the Domestic Violence Services Network.

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE would like to remind residents about the resources available to the community:

Domestic Violence Services Network
888-399-6111
dvsn.org

National Teen Dating Violence Helpline
866-331-9474
loveisrespect.org

Break the Cycle
310-286-3383
breakthecycle.org

Futures Without Violence
415-678-5500
futureswithoutviolence.org

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
nctsn.org

Next Newsletter Topic: Great American Smokeout

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Light in the Darkness Candlelight Vigil
Thursday, Oct. 26 at 6:30 p.m. @ Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School

Wings for Autism
Saturday, Nov. 4 at 9 a.m. @ Logan Airport, Terminal E

“If Only” Film Screening
Tuesday, Nov. 7 at 6:30 p.m. @ Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School

Dr. Karen Levine’s Presentation on Anxiety
Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. @ Curtis Middle School in the Library

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

The post Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter October 24 appeared first on Sudbury Lincoln CRANE.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter October 10 http://cranehelp.org/2017/10/10/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-october-10/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/10/10/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-october-10/#respond Tue, 10 Oct 2017 18:15:04 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=19749 While October is a time when people think of seasons changing, cooler weather moving in and the holidays fast approaching, it is also an important time for residents to be thinking about safety in honor of National Fire Prevention Month and with Halloween around the corner.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter
October 10

FEATURED TOPIC: FALL FAMILY SAFETY

While October is a time when people think of seasons changing, cooler weather moving in and the holidays fast approaching, it is also an important time for residents to be thinking about safety in honor of National Fire Prevention Month and with Halloween around the corner.

 

Fire Safety

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE would like to provide residents with safety precautions to implement in order to prevent house fires and the appropriate actions to take if there is one in your home:

• Take the simple step of making sure there are working smoke alarms on every level of the home and outside each sleeping area.

• Consider installing smoke alarms inside bedrooms, especially for smokers or heavy sleepers.

• Test smoke alarms monthly and replace alkaline batteries twice a year – for instance, when changing clocks for Daylight Savings.

• Replace all smoke alarms that are 10 years old or older.

House fires occur more often than you may think. According to the United States Fire Administration, “residential” is the leading property type for fire deaths, making up for 75 percent of structure fires. In 2015, there were 380,900 residential fires, killing 2,565 people.

Conduct home fire escape drills frequently, at least twice a year, so actions become automatic. Establish a meeting place somewhere outside and away from their home like a neighbor’s mailbox, a fence post or tree. Remember to take the following steps to prepare all family members on what do if there is a fire:

• Hold a family fire drill during the day, while everyone is awake and another one at night while children are asleep to see how they will respond. Following the drill, make adjustments to the plan.

• Does someone in the family, who may be too young or physically impaired, need assistance? If so, an adult should be assigned to go to that person’s room and assist him/her to an alternate escape route.

• If a child sleeps through an alarm, he or she may need to be awakened by an adult.

• Teach everyone the “Stop, Drop and Roll” technique in case clothing catches on fire.

• Make sure children understand that matches, lighters and candles are not toys and they should never play with them.

For more information about fire safety, visit sparky.org or the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services website.

Halloween Safety

Halloween is an exciting time for children who enjoy dressing up and trick-or-treating with friends. As children get older, many of them may want to go trick-or-treating by themselves.

Parents should remind their children to:

• Only go to well-lit homes and remain on porches rather than entering houses.

• Travel in small groups and be accompanied by an adult.

• Know a parent’s phone number in case an emergency telephone call is necessary.

• Bring treats home before eating them so parents can inspect them.

• Use costume knives and swords that are flexible, not rigid or sharp.

• Use flashlights to light your way and always walk on sidewalks.

• Cross streets at the corner and use crosswalks. Look left, right, and left again before crossing the street. Do not cross between parked cars.

• Wear clothing that is bright, reflective and flame retardant.

• Consider using face paint instead of masks. (Masks can obstruct your vision.)

• Avoid wearing hats that will slide over your eyes, and long, baggy or loose costumes, along with over-sized shoes (to prevent tripping).

Parents and guardians should:

• Supervise children under 12 years old.

• Establish a curfew for older children.

• Avoid giving choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys as treats to young children.

• Inspect all candy for safety before children eat it.

• If driving children between houses and neighborhoods, have them get out of cars on the curbside, not on the traffic side.

For information about raising awareness of food allergies and promoting inclusion of all trick-or-treaters throughout the Halloween season, visit the Teal Pumpkin Project website.

Next Newsletter Topic: Healthy Relationships

UPCOMING EVENTS

Survival and Empowerment: Survivor Speaker’s Bureau Presentation
Tuesday, Oct. 10 at 3 p.m. @ Wayland Public Safety Building

Metrowest Adolescent Survey Results
Wednesday, Oct. 11 at 7:30 p.m. @ Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School

Light in the Darkness Candlelight Vigil
Thursday, Oct. 26 at 6:30 p.m. @ Lincoln Sudbury Regional High School

Wings for Autism
Saturday, Nov. 4 at 9 a.m. @ Logan Airport, Terminal E

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

The post Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter October 10 appeared first on Sudbury Lincoln CRANE.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter September 12 http://cranehelp.org/2017/09/14/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-september-12/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/09/14/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-september-12/#respond Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:59:39 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=16479 Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc. 390 Lincoln Road Sudbury, MA 01776 Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017 Contact: John Guilfoil Phone: 617-993-0003 Email: john@jgpr.net Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter September 12 FEATURED TOPIC: BACK TO SCHOOL Welcome back! We hope you all are having a successful start to the school year! As students begin to settle back into their… Read More»

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter September 12

FEATURED TOPIC: BACK TO SCHOOL

Welcome back! We hope you all are having a successful start to the school year!

As students begin to settle back into their routines, it is important for parents and guardians to be mindful that changing schedules and, for some students, an increased workload can be stressful for both children and families as a whole.

In order to keep stress levels down and help students stay organized and avoid feeling overwhelmed, CRANE would like to offer several tips from KidsHealth to families as the school year gets underway.

Talk to your child. Asking students about their fears or worries about going back to school will help them feel less alone. Let them know you understand and are aware of what they’re going through and you’re there to help them with anything they need.

Get involved. Maintain an open line of communication with teachers. E-mail or talk with them throughout the school year to discuss your child’s academic strengths and weaknesses.

Limit stress where possible. If certain situations are causing your child to feel stressed or overwhelmed, see if there are ways to change things. For example, if too many after-school activities are consistently causing homework stress, it may be necessary to limit activities to leave time and energy for homework.

Help with Homework. Make sure your child is doing their homework in a quiet place that is free of distractions. Set rules for when homework and studying need to be done. Keep texting a social media to a minimum during homework time. Never do homework or projects for your child, but make sure they know you are always available to help or answer questions.

Be patient. As a parent, it hurts to see your child unhappy or stressed. But, try to resist the urge to fix every problem and instead focus on helping your child, slowly but surely, grow into a good problem solver.

Next Newsletter Topic: Disordered Eating

UPCOMING EVENTS

MEDA Presentation on Eating Disorders
Thursday, Sept. 28 at 7:30 p.m. @ Curtis Middle School Auditorium

5th Annual Walk, Roll, Shobble, Stroll for Children with Special Needs
Sunday, Oct. 1 at 12 p.m. @ Pappas Rehabilitation Hospital for Children

Especially for Me! Free Autism Friendly Afternoon!
Tuesday, Oct. 3 at 1:30 p.m. @ Children’s Discovery Museum and Discovery Woods

An Evening with Temple Grandin: Connecting Animal Science and Autism
Wednesday, Oct. 4 at 5:30 p.m. @ UMass Boston

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter May 24 http://cranehelp.org/2017/05/24/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-may-24/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/05/24/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-may-24/#respond Wed, 24 May 2017 18:43:24 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=9528 FEATURED TOPIC: Stress & Anxiety in Young Children

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter May 24

FEATURED TOPIC: Stress & Anxiety in Young Children

Stress can affect anyone who feels overwhelmed — even children. It may be difficult for adults to understand why a child might suffer from stress or anxiety, when they don’t have many responsibilities. However, even very young children can have worries or even feel stressed at times.

According to KidsHealth from Nemours, stress is a function of the demands placed on us and our ability to meet them. These demands can come from family, jobs, friends or school, but can also come from within, often related to what we think we should be doing versus what we’re actually able to do.

Nemours is a nonprofit pediatric health system dedicated to life-changing medical care and research, helping kids grow up healthy, advocating for kids nationally and training tomorrow’s pediatric experts.

Children as young as preschoolers can feel the impact of stress in the form of anxiety when they’re separated from their parents. As children get older, pressures from school and social environments can also create higher levels of stress.

According to the 2016 MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey, the percentage of students at the Curtis Middle School who reported feeling that life was “very” stressful in the past 30 days increased from 12-13 percent in 2014 to 16 percent in 2016. Survey results also indicate that reports of recent stress increase by grade, from 13 percent in seventh grade to 18 percent in eighth grade, and that reports of stress are nearly twice as high among females (20 percent) as males (11 percent).

Stress related to school issues is most common, reported by 44 percent of students, followed by stress related to social issues, reported by 19 percent of students.

KidsHealth reports that other sources of stress include:

  • Too many activities. Many kids are too busy to have time to play creatively or relax after school. Children who complain about all their activities or who refuse to go to them might be over-scheduled.
  • Other people’s stress. Kids’ stress may be intensified by more than just what’s happening in their own lives. Do your kids hear you talking about troubles at work, worrying about a relative’s illness or arguing with your spouse about financial matters?
  • World news. Kids who see disturbing images on TV or hear talk of natural disasters, war and terrorism may worry about their own safety and that of the people they love.
  • Complicating factors. Complicating factors such as an illness, death of a loved one, or a divorce can magnify stress when added to the everyday pressures that children face. Even the most amicable divorce can be tough for kids because their basic security system — their family — is undergoing a big change.

It may not always be easy to recognize when a child is feeling stressed out. However, short-term behavioral changes such as mood swings, acting out, changes in sleep patterns, or bedwetting can be indications. Some children may experience physical symptoms like stomachaches or headaches, and others may have trouble concentrating or completing schoolwork.

Younger children may develop new habits like thumb sucking, hair twirling or nose picking. Older children may begin to lie, bully or defy authority. A child who is stressed may also overreact to minor problems, have nightmares, become clingy or have drastic changes in academic performance.

To help your child reduce and cope with stress, KidsHealth recommends the following:

  • Proper rest and good nutrition can boost coping skills, as can good parenting. Make time for your children every day — whether they need to talk or just be in the same room with you, make yourself available and express interest in them.
  • Talk about what might be causing your child’s stress. Together, you can come up with solutions like cutting back on after-school activities, spending more time talking with parents or teachers, developing an exercise regimen or keeping a journal.
  • Anticipate potentially stressful situations and help your child prepare for them.
  • Some level of stress is normal. Let your kids know it’s OK to feel angry, scared, lonely, or anxious, and that other people share those feelings. Reassurance is important, so remind them you’re confident that they can handle the situation.
  • When children can’t or won’t discuss their stressful issues, try talking about your own. This shows that you’re willing to tackle tough topics and are available to talk with them when they’re ready.
  • Books can help young kids identify with characters in stressful situations and learn how they cope.

Parents should know that, in general, they have the skills to deal with their child’s stress and should feel confident in their ability to help their children. The time to seek professional help is if any of these changes in behavior persist, when stress is causing serious anxiety, or when the behavior causes significant problems at school or at home.

For more information and resources about young children and stress, visit the KidsHealth website or talk to your child’s doctor.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Sudbury SEPAC Lotus Blossom Fundraiser
Tuesday, May 30 from 5-9 p.m. at Lotus Blossom

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

Do you appreciate CRANE’s services? If you do, then we need your help!

Our services are completely free, but they are not cost free. Please consider a donation to support CRANE. Donations of any size are helpful and very much appreciated!

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter May 10 http://cranehelp.org/2017/05/12/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-may-10/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/05/12/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-may-10/#respond Fri, 12 May 2017 18:29:06 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=9157 Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc. 390 Lincoln Road Sudbury, MA 01776 Wednesday, May 10, 2017 Contact: John Guilfoil Phone: 617-993-0003 Email: john@jgpr.net Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter May 10 FEATURED TOPIC: Children & Technology Children and adolescents today are constantly immersed in technology and digital media and the amount of time that youths are spending on TV, computers, smartphones… Read More»

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter May 10

FEATURED TOPIC: Children & Technology

Children and adolescents today are constantly immersed in technology and digital media and the amount of time that youths are spending on TV, computers, smartphones and other screens is raising concerns about the amount of screen time that youths are getting.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (APA), media can influence how children and teens feel, learn, think and behave. Overuse of digital media and screens may also put your child at risk of:

  • Obesity. Excessive screen use, as well as having a TV in the bedroom, can increase the risk of obesity. Teens who watch more than five hours of TV per day are five times more likely to be overweight than teens who watch zero to two hours. Watching TV for more than 1.5 hours daily is a risk factor for obesity for children 4 through 9 years of age. This is in part due to the fact that viewers are exposed to advertising for high-calorie foods. Viewers are also more likely to snack or overeat while watching screen media.
  • Sleep problems. Media use can interfere with sleep. Children and teens who spend more time with social media or who sleep with mobile devices in their rooms are at greater risk for sleep problems. Exposure to light (particularly blue light) and stimulating content from screens can delay or disrupt sleep, and have a negative effect on school.
  • Problematic internet use. Children who overuse online media can be at risk for problematic Internet use. Heavy video gamers are at risk for Internet gaming disorder. They spend most of their free time online, and show less interest in offline or “real-life” relationships. Four percent to 8 percent of children and teens may have problems limiting their Internet use, and almost 10 percent of US youth 8 to 18 years of age may have Internet gaming disorder. There may be increased risks for depression at both the high and low ends of Internet use.
  • Negative effect on school performance. Children and teens often use entertainment media at the same time that they’re doing other things, such as homework. Such multi-tasking can have a negative effect on school.
  • Risky behaviors. Teens’ displays on social media often show risky behaviors, such as substance use, sexual behaviors, self-injury, or eating disorders. Exposure of teens through media to alcohol, tobacco use, or sexual behaviors is associated with earlier initiation of these behaviors.
  • Sexting, privacy and predators. Sexting is sending nude or semi-nude images as well as sexually explicit text messages using a cell phone. About 12 percent of youth age 10 to 19 years of age have sent a sexual photo to someone else. Teens need to know that once content is shared with others they may not be able to delete or remove it completely. They may also not know about or choose not to use privacy settings. Another risk is that sex offenders may use social networking, chat rooms, e-mail, and online games to contact and exploit children.
  • Cyberbullying. Children and teens online can be victims of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying can lead to short- and long-term negative social, academic, and health issues for both the bully and the target. Fortunately, programs to help prevent bullying may reduce cyberbullying.

While too much screen time can be harmful to youths, technology in moderation is OK and can even have some benefits. The APA recommends that entertainment “screen time” be limited to two hours a day for children between the ages of 3-18, and for children 2 years of age and younger, none at all. Children and teens also shouldn’t sleep with devices in their bedrooms, including TVs, computers and smartphones.

Parents should develop personalized media use plans for their children, taking into account their child’s age, health, personality and developmental stage, and teach children about the importance of privacy online.

Parents and guardians should encourage children to spend more time off screen and take advantage of the many programs, activities and groups that Sudbury and Lincoln have to offer, especially with summer approaching.

Visit the Sudbury Parks and Recreation Department website or the Lincoln Parks and Recreation website for a complete list of available programs.

For more information about the effects of technology on children visit the American Academy of Pediatrics healthychildren.org website.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Screenagers
Tuesday, May 9 at 7 p.m. at the Brooks Auditorium in Lincoln

Kids Count, Too!
Tuesday, May 10 at 5:30 p.m. at the Community Senior Center in Natick

Research Collaboration on the Prosecution of Child Sexual Abuse
Thursday, May 11 at 12:30 p.m. at the Wellesley Centers for Women

Sudbury SEPAC Lotus Blossom Fundraiser
Tuesday, May 30 from 5-9 p.m. at Lotus Blossom

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

The post Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter May 10 appeared first on Sudbury Lincoln CRANE.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter March 30 http://cranehelp.org/2017/03/30/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-march-30/ http://cranehelp.org/2017/03/30/sudbury-lincoln-crane-newsletter-march-30/#respond Thu, 30 Mar 2017 20:40:08 +0000 http://cranehelp.org/?p=7859 While the percentage of adults who smoke cigarettes in the United States is down, cigarette smoking remains high among certain populations, including young adults. This means that it is still very important to talk to your kids early on about smoking cigarettes and other forms of tobacco, and the negative health effects they cause.

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Sudbury Lincoln CRANE, Inc.
390 Lincoln Road
Sudbury, MA 01776

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Sudbury Lincoln CRANE Newsletter March 30

FEATURED TOPIC: The State of Smoking

While the percentage of adults who smoke cigarettes in the United States is down, cigarette smoking remains high among certain populations, including young adults. This means that it is still very important to talk to your kids early on about smoking cigarettes and other forms of tobacco, and the negative health effects they cause.

Preventing tobacco use among youth is critical to ending smoking in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), tobacco use begins primarily during adolescence and nearly nine out of 10 cigarette smokers first tried smoking by 18, and 99 percent first tried smoking by age 26.

Every day in the United States, more than 3,200 youth ages 18 or younger smoke their first cigarette. Flavorings in tobacco products can make them more appealing to younger people, and that in 2014, 73 percent of high school students and 56 percent of middle school students who used tobacco products in the last 30 days reported using a flavored tobacco product.

The CDC reports that cigarette smoking declined among middle and high school students from 2011 to 2015. Trends in the Lincoln and Sudbury communities are encouraging, too.

According to the 2014 MetroWest Adolescent Health Survey, cigarette use among Curtis Middle School students remained low with 3 percent of students reporting using cigarettes in their lifetime. Results of the same survey at Lincoln Sudbury High School showed that the number of students who reported using cigarettes in their lifetime decreased from 31 percent in 2006 to 13 percent in 2014.

While cigarette smoking has declined among youth in the United States in recent years, the use of other tobacco products in on the rise.

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The American Lung Association recommends that parents and guardians follow these tips when talking to their children about smoking tobacco, in any form:

  • Tell your children honestly and directly that you don’t want them to smoke cigarettes. Give them clear, consistent messages about the risks of smoking.
  • Start talking to your kids about smoking when they are young, about 5 or 6 years old, and continue through their high school years. Explain the health dangers of smoking, as well as the unpleasant physical aspects such as bad breath, and discolored teeth and nails.
  • Set a good example for your kids by not smoking. Parents who smoke are more likely to have children who smoke.
  • If you’re a parent who smokes, the best thing you can do is to quit. Talk to your kids about how difficult it is to quit smoking and how much easier it would have been if you’d never started smoking in the first place. In the meantime, don’t smoke around your children and never let them have any of your cigarettes.
  • Establish a smoke-free policy in your home. Don’t allow anyone to smoke indoors.
  • Support tobacco-free schools and insist that school health programs include tobacco-use prevention education.
  • Find out if your children have any friends that smoke. Talk with your kids about ways to refuse a cigarette.
  • If you catch your teen smoking, avoid threats and ultimatums. Ask a few questions and find out why your child is smoking; he or she may want to be accepted by a peer group or want your attention. Talk about what changes can be made in your teen’s life to help him or her stop smoking.
  • As you talk to your child about their smoking, point out that he or she is probably already addicted to nicotine. The tobacco industry spends billions of dollars each year to make sure their products are as appealing and as addictive as possible. Ask your child to think about how they’ve been manipulated and used by tobacco companies. This realization makes many teen smokers angry and can help motivate them to quit.

For more information about smoking and how to talk to your kids about it, visit the American Lung Association’s website or thetruth.com.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Resilient Parent Series: Masterminds and Wingmen
Thursday, April 6 at 7 p.m. at Natick High School

Strategies to Help Parents Teach Social-Emotional Skills to Children Age 2-6
Thursday, April 13 at 6:30 p.m. at Drumlin Farm

Love That Boy
Wednesday, April 19 at 7 p.m. at The Gallery at Villageworks in Acton

Suicide Prevention Walk
Saturday, April 29 at RJ Grey Field in Acton

OTHER RESOURCES

William James College INTERFACE Referral Service is a mental health and wellness referral line available to families in the Sudbury and Lincoln Communities as well as Boston families with children in the Sudbury and Lincoln schools. This free and confidential service is available to residents of all ages in member towns.

Callers will be asked to describe their need and provide insurance, appointment time and location preferences. INTERFACE staff will then use their extensive database to find a licensed therapist or provider match with the appropriate specialization. They are able to make referrals in the Sudbury, Lincoln and Boston areas. INTERFACE is available Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 888-244-6843 (toll free).

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